Tag Archives: Gibson Lucille

BB King Gibson Lucille

bbk

 

Riley BB King Gibson Lucille has been called the “King of the Blues” and
More than any other musician of the postwar era, King brought the blues from the margins to the mainstream. His influence on a generation of rock and blues guitarists – including Eric Clapton, Mike Bloomfield and Stevie Ray Vaughan – has been inestimable. “We don’t play rock and roll,” he said in 1957. “Our music is blues, straight from the Delta.” Yet without formally crossing into rock and roll, King forged an awareness of blues within the rock realm, particularly in the Sixties and Seventies.

Born on a cotton plantation in tiny Itta Bena, Mississippi, in 1925, King moved to Memphis, Tennessee in his early twenties with the intention of making his living playing the blues. He landed a regular spot as a deejay and performer on radio station WDIA, where he became known as the Beale Street Blues Boy (hence, “B.B.”). BB king gibson lucille also built a reputation as a hot guitarist at the Beale Street blues clubs, performing with a loose-knit group known as the Beale Streeters. This group included BB King Gibson Lucille vocalist Bobby Blue Bland, a longtime peer and collaborator.

King began recording in 1949 and signed with West Coast record man Jules Bihari a year later. He would record prolifically for the Bihari brothers’ labels – RPM, Kent and Crown – through 1962. King’s first BB King Gibson Lucille hit, “Three O’Clock Blues,” topped the rhythm & blues chart for five weeks in 1952. Other classics cut by King in the Fifties include “Sweet Black Angel,” “Every Day I Have the Blues” and three more R&B chart-toppers: “You Know I Love You,” “Please Love Me” and “You Upset Me Baby.”

Dissatisfied with royalty rates and songwriting credits, King signed with ABC-Paramount in the early Sixties, when his contract with the Biharis expired. At that time, ABC was cultivating a stable of black artists that included Ray Charles, Lloyd Price and Fats Domino. They paired King with an arranger, and his studio records took on a more polished, sophisticated and eclectic tone. Pushing the blues in new directions, King was rewarded with such breakthrough hits as “The Thrill Is Gone,” which featured his soulful voice and guitar over a backdrop of strings. He also cut raw, energetic concert LPs – Live at the Regal (1965) and Live at Cook County Jail (1971) – that are classics of the genre.

Live at the Regal, recorded before a lively crowd at a black Chicago nightspot of longstanding, is the perfect match between performer and audience, with the latter’s enthusiasm fuelling the former’s fire. Other highlights of his lengthy tenure at ABC include a pair of mid-Seventies live albums with Bobby Blue Bland and Midnight Believer, a jazzy BB King Gibson Lucille collaboration with the Crusaders. Blues purists treasure such back-to-the-roots efforts as Lucille Talks Back (1975) and Blues ‘n’ Jazz (1983). Favorites of rock fans include Indianola Mississippi Seeds (1970), which found King joined by Leon Russell, Joe Walsh and Carole King; B.B. King in London (1971), made with a host of British rock musicians; and Riding With the King (2000), a collaboration with Eric Clapton. King won Grammy Awards for Best Traditional Blues Recording for Live at the Apollo (1991) and Blues Summit (1993).

Gibson Lucille Red

gibson lucille red

The Gibson Lucille Red series is a magic. The lucille guitar bb king es 335 black is the basics. The gibson lucille red is the ES-345. It drops dead gorgeous! The gibson lucille red was first produced in 1958 as upscale version of ES-335. Although the design is very similar to the 335, the gibson lucille red featured a multi-position “Varitone” switch located just above the lead tone and volume controls, which added various combinations of inductors and capacitors to the electronic pickup circuit of the guitar in order to alter its resonant frequency and add “color” to the sound. The gibson lucille red also featured an optional stereophonic output jack, gold-plated hardware, large split parallelogram fingerboard inlays (similar to ES 175), and a thicker three-ply edge binding than that of the ES-335. Notable users were Freddie King, John McLaughlin, Jorma Kaukonen, Fred Frith and Elvin Bishop.

It was discontinued in 1981, one year after the Gibson Lucille Red was launched. As of 2012, the ES-345 is available as limited edition of Epiphone, as well as the ES-355. The differences between two models are:
The headstock of Gibson Lucille Red inlay on the gibson lucille red is a “small crown”, instead of a “split-diamond” custom inlay on the ES-355.
The position markers on gibson lucille red are “double parallelogram”, instead of the “block” inlays on the ES-355. Also, the first fret on the gibson lucille red is not inlaid.

The stereo output wiring and the Varitone was factory-installed on the gibson lucille red and ES-355TD-SV, but not on the unmodified ES-355TD (mono version).
The vibrato unit (Vibrola or Bigsby) was an option on the gibson lucille red; In contrast, it was factory-installed on most Gibson Lucille Red (except for the earlier models in the 1950s, final models after 1979,and Lucille).

The variations  Gibson Lucille Red of he gibson bb king lucille guitar review is worth noticing.
The ES-345 was first produced in 1958 as upscale version of ES-335.
The ES-355TD (Thinline semi-hollow, Double pickups) was at the top of Gibson’s range of thinline semi-acoustic guitars.
The EB-2 was first produced in 1958 as the bass version of the ES-335. Having the same body as the ES-335, it held a 30.5″ scale neck and hardware borrowed directly from the Gibson EB-0.

The CS-336 is a smaller version of the gibson bb king lucille guitar review. The back and sides of this guitar are constructed from a single piece of carved mahogany, and its reduced size is closer to that of the Les Paul.
And Other models based on the 335 include the ES-333, the ES-340 (the toggle switch has settings of the pickups in-phase, pickups out-of-phase and standby), the ES-347 (includes a coil tap, block markers on an ebony fretboard, fine tuning tailpiece and, on earlier models, a brass nut), the ES-339, essentially a 335 with the body reduced to Les Paul size; and the Gibson Les Paul signature bass.

Although the ES-330 resembles the 335, it is actually fully hollow (as opposed to semi-hollow) and features two P-90 pickups (as opposed to 2 humbucking pickups), and was designed as the successor of the Gibson ES-225.

 

BB King Gibson Lucille Guitar

gibson bb king guitar

Riley B. King (born September 16, 1925), known by the stage name B.B. King, is an American blues musician, singer, songwriter, and guitarist.
King gradually developed one of the world’s most identifiable guitar styles. He borrowed from Blind Lemon Jefferson, T-Bone Walker and others, integrating his precise and complex vocal-like string bends and his left hand vibrato, both of which have become indispensable components of rock guitarists’ vocabulary. His economy and phrasing has been a model for thousands of players. King has mixed blues, jazz, swing, mainstream pop and jump into a unique sound. In King’s words, “When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille.” and the bb king gibson lucille guitar developed his loyal partner.
The gibson es 335 bb king is the world’s first commercial thinline archtop semi-acoustic electric guitar. Released by the Gibson Guitar Corporation as part of its ES (Electric Spanish) series in 1958, it is neither hollow nor solid; instead, a solid maple wood block runs through the center of its body. The side “wings” of the gibson es 335 bb king are hollow, and the top has two violin-style f-holes over the hollow chambers.

There is the specs about the bb king gibson lucille guitar:
Manufacturer Gibson
Period 1958–present
Construction
Body type Semi-hollow
Neck joint Set
Scale 24.75 in (629 mm)
Woods
Body maple (plywood); usually maple center block
Neck mahogany on most models in most periods; sometimes maple
Fretboard rosewood on most models, ebony on some
And some features about the magic bb king es 335:
Laminated Maple Top, Back and Rims
Three-piece maple neck with Gibson’s traditional rounded profile
Gold hardware, metal tulip tuners, a Nashville Tune-o-matic bridge and TP-6 tailpiece
Two volume, two tone knobs, and a three-way selector switch, Vari-tone switch, and both stereo and mono jacks
Includes case, custom care kit and certificate of bb king gibson guitar authenticity

We’d like to custom the bb king gibson lucille guitar that you want to realize your guitar dream and create a wonderful story between you and your own guitar. It is our pleasure.

 

 

 

Gibson Lucille Review

gibson lucille review

Riley Gibson Lucille Review  has been called the “King of the Blues” and
More than any other musician of the postwar era, King brought the blues from the margins to the mainstream. His influence on a generation of rock and blues guitarists – including Eric Clapton, Mike Bloomfield and Stevie Ray Vaughan – has been inestimable. “We don’t play rock and roll,” he said in 1957. “Our music is blues, straight from the Delta.” Yet without formally crossing into rock and roll, King forged an awareness of blues within the rock realm, particularly in the Sixties and Seventies.

Born on a cotton plantation in tiny Itta Bena, Mississippi, in 1925, King moved to Memphis, Tennessee in his early twenties with the intention of making his living playing the blues. He landed a regular spot as a deejay and performer on radio station WDIA, where he became known as the Beale Street Gibson Lucille Review Blues Boy (hence, “B.B.”). King also built a reputation as a hot guitarist at the Beale Street blues clubs, performing with a gibson bb king lucille ebony known as the Beale Streeters. This group included vocalist Bobby Blue Bland, a longtime peer and collaborator.

Gibson Lucille Review began recording in 1949 and signed with West Coast record man Jules Bihari a year later. He would record prolifically for the Bihari brothers’ labels – RPM, Kent and Crown – through 1962. King’s first hit, “Three O’Clock Blues,” topped the rhythm & blues chart for five weeks in 1952. Other classics cut by King in the Fifties include “Sweet Black Angel,” “Every Day I Have the Blues” and three more R&B chart-toppers: “You Know I Love You,” “Please Love Me” and “You Upset Me Baby.”

Dissatisfied with royalty rates and songwriting credits, King signed with ABC-Paramount in the early Sixties Gibson Lucille Review, when his contract with the Biharis expired. At that time, ABC was cultivating a stable of black artists that included Ray Charles, Lloyd Price and Fats Domino. They paired King with an arranger, and his studio records took on a more polished, sophisticated and eclectic tone. Pushing the blues in new gibson bb king lucille ebony directions, King was rewarded with such breakthrough hits as “The Thrill Is Gone,” which featured his soulful voice and guitar over a backdrop of strings. He also cut raw, energetic concert LPs – Live at the Regal (1965) and Live at Cook County Jail (1971) – that are classics of the genre.

Live at the Regal, recorded before a lively crowd at a black Chicago nightspot of longstanding, is the perfect match between performer and audience, with the latter’s enthusiasm fuelling the former’s fire. Other highlights of his lengthy tenure at ABC include a pair of mid-Seventies live albums with Bobby Blue Bland and Midnight Believer, a jazzy collaboration with the Crusaders. Blues purists treasure such back-to-the-roots efforts as Lucille Talks Back (1975) and Blues ‘n’ Jazz (1983). Favorites Gibson Lucille Review of rock fans include Indianola Mississippi Seeds (1970), which found King joined by Leon Russell, Joe Walsh and Carole King; B.B. King in London (1971), made with a host of British rock musicians; and Riding With the King (2000), a collaboration with Eric Clapton. King won Grammy Awards for Best Traditional Blues Recording for Live at the Apollo (1991) and Blues Summit (1993).

Gibson Lucille Bb King

gibson lucille bb king

“Ambassador of the Blues Gibson Lucille Bb King ,” and indeed he’s reigned across the decades as the genre’s most recognizable and influential artist. His half-century of success owes much to his hard work as a touring musician who consistently logged between 200 and 300 shows a year. Through it all he’s remained faithful to the blues while keeping abreast of contemporary trends and deftly incorporating other favored forms – jazz and pop, for instance – into his musical overview. Much like such colleagues and contemporaries as Buddy Guy and John Lee Hooker, B.B. King managed to change with the changing times while adhering to his blues roots.

As a guitarist, King is best-known for his single-note solos, played on a hollowbody Gibson Lucille Bb King guitar. King’s unique tone is velvety and regal, with a discernible sting. He’s known for his trilling vibrato, wicked string bends, and a judicious approach that makes every note count. Back in the early days, King nicknamed his guitar “Lucille,” as if it were a woman with whom he was having a dialogue. In fact, King regards his guitar as an extension of his voice (and vice versa). “The minute I stop singing orally,” King has noted, “I start to sing by playing Lucille.”

There have been many Gibson Lucille Bb King over the years, and Gibson has even marketed a namesake model with King’s approval. King selected the name in the mid-Fifties after rescuing his guitar from a nightclub fire started by two men arguing over a woman. Her name? Lucille.

King doesn’t play chords or slide; instead, he bends individual strings till the notes seem to cry. His style reflects his upbringing in the Mississippi Delta and coming of age in Memphis. Seminal early influences included such bluesmen as T-Bone Walker (whose “Stormy Monday,” King has said, is “what really started me to play the blues”), Lonnie Johnson, Sonny Boy Williamson and Bukka White. A cousin of King’s, White schooled the fledgling guitarist in the idiom when he moved to Memphis.

King also admired jazz Gibson Lucille Bb King guitarists Charlie Christian and Django Reinhart. Horns have played a big part in King’s music, and he’s successfully combined jazz and blues in a big-band context.
“I’ve always felt that there’s nothing wrong with listening to and trying to learn more,” King has said. “You just can’t stay in the same groove all the time.” This willingness to explore and grow explains King’s Gibson Lucille Bb King popularity across five decades in a wide variety of venues, from funky juke joints to posh Las Vegas lounges.

Gibson Lucille Price

Gibson makes authorized copies of Gibson Lucille Price, its most successful guitar designs. They are less expensive than those bearing the Gibson name. And differences in guitar styles, guitar materials and models items, as well as area all have certain effect on the gibson lucille price. Each gibson lucille price is reasonable on the base of above condition. A former competitor, Epiphone was purchased by Gibson and now makes competitively priced Gibson models, such as the Les Paul and SG, sold under the gibson 335 lucille Epiphone brand, while continuing to make Epiphone-specific Gibson Lucille Price models like the Sheraton and Casino. In Japan, Orville by Gibson once made Gibson designs sold in that country. Gibson has sought legal action against those that make and sell guitars Gibson believes are too similar to their own.

For kinds of Gibson Lucille Price fans, the guitar lucille gibson is acceptable and reasonable.

gibson bb king guitareegibson bb king guitareee
The Gibson ES-335 is the world’s first commercial thinline archtop semi-acoustic electric guitar. Released by the Gibson Guitar Corporation as part of its es b.b. king 335 (Electric Spanish) series in 1958, b.b. king 335 is neither hollow nor solid; instead, a solid maple wood block runs through the center of its body. The side “wings” of the gibson bb king guitar are hollow, and the top of the gibson bb king guitar has two violin-style f-holes over the hollow chambers.
The b.b. king 335’s models feature a coil split switch, which allows the humbuckers to produce a “single-coil” sound. The ES-335 Pro, ES-335TD CRS and CRR models were equipped with Gibson “Dirty Fingers” humbuckers, which had a significantly higher output than the standard pickups.

The company has produced a number of signature guitars as well, such as Trini Lopez-inspired model (1964-1970) with narrow diamond-shaped soundholes replacing the f-holes, a Firebird-style headstock with all the tuners on one side, and slashed-diamond inlays. In September 2007, Gibson Lucille Price introduced the DG-335, designed in collaboration with Dave Grohl, a variation on the Trini Lopez Gibson; the Grohl model has a stopbar tailpiece and Gibson’s new Burstbucker humbuckers. Other signature models include the heavily customized Alvin Lee “Big Red” 335. A reissue of the 1963 model was a 2014 “Editor’s pick” in Guitar Player magazine, at $4000.